All About Eyecare,  Eye Health & Info

What Are The Sunglasses Standards?

All sunglasses must meet the requirements of certain standards. From 1st July 2019, all fashion spectacle suppliers must comply with requirements set out by consumer goods. There are three main standards which were set by the US, Australia and Europe. These standards ensure all sunglasses meet the requirement for UV protection, visible light protection, and even impact resistance.

DO NOT confuse the darkness (tint) of the lenses with their ability to filter UV rays. A pair of dark sunglasses doesn’t mean you are protected from the UV rays. You are more at risk of damaging your eyes by wearing dark sunglasses with a low or zero UV filter.

Australian Standard

 The Australian standard is the AS/NZS 1067:1:2016. The standards test on the transmittance of visible white light (light we can see). The Australian standard has categorised the lens filters into four ranging from 0 to 4.

Lens 0 – These fashion spectacles are not sunglasses as they have limited or no UV protection, therefore low ability to reduce sun glare.

Lens 1 – Not sunglasses but can be used for fashion spectacles. These lenses provide limited sun glare protection and are not suitable for night driving. 

Lens 2 – These lenses are classed as sunglasses and they have a medium level of sun glare reduction and good UV protection. 

Lens 3 – These glasses provide a high level of sun glare reduction and UV protection.

Lens 4 – Special purpose sunglasses with good UV protection and a very high level of sun glare reduction. This lens category must not be used while driving. 

European Standard

 The European standard is EN 12312-1 . The European standard tests on UV transmittance and categorised the four filter levels (0-4). The British standard (BS EN 12312-1) test sunglasses against their UV transmittance.  All sunglasses that meet the British standard will carry the ‘CE‘ mark or ‘UV 400’ which should be visible on the sunglasses.

US Standard

 The US standard is the ANSI Z80.3-2018. This standard requires all sunglasses (including toy sunglasses that can be worn as fashion sunglasses) to be tested for UV and visible light transmittance, as well as meeting the FDA standard 21 CFR 801.410 for impact resistance.

Tint Depths

Below are the tint depths FashionEyewear offers with prescription sunglasses. All of our lenses and tint depths protect you from UV light transmittance.

0 – Non or very light tint

  • For aesthetic, fashion or comfort purposes

1 – Light tint 

  • Only 25% tinted (slightly tinted)
  • Suitable for indoor use
  • 100% UV protection
  • Weak levels of sunlight

2 – Medium tint 

  • 60% tinted
  • Suitable for driving
  • Best for medium sunlight
  • 100% UV protection
  • Average levels of sunlight 

3 – Standard tint

  • 75% tinted
  • Suitable for driving
  • Best for medium-strong sunlight
  • 100% UV protection
  • For use in strong sunlight
  • Best for water or snow sports where light is reflected

4 – Dark tint

  • 85% tinted
  • Best for strong sunlight
  • 100% UV protection
  • Not suitable for driving
  • For exceptional levels of sunlight 

More common questions…

  1. Does the colour of the lens make a difference?

Shade number/ tint depth counts over lens colour. 

DO NOT confuse the darkness (tint) of the lenses with their ability to filter UV rays. A pair of dark sunglasses doesn’t mean you are protected from the UV rays. You are more at risk of damaging your eyes by wearing dark sunglasses with a low or zero UV filter.

2. Which glasses should I buy for safety?

Choose plastic, toughened or laminated glass lenses. 

3. What are graduated tints?

These are lenses which are tinted darker at the top than the bottom. Good for bright overhead lights, map reading and seeing the dashboard while driving. 

4. What are photochromic lenses?

Lenses which darken on exposure to sunlight and react to changing light conditions. Also known as light-sensitive and transitions.  

5. What are polarised lenses?

Lenses which reduce reflections from wet or polished road services. 

6. Which glasses are best for driving?

Glasses with a 2 or 3 tint depth along with a graduated tint. 

Still unsure?

 If you still need help with understanding the lens tint depths we offer, contact us to speak to a member of our Customer Service team.

If you found this post helpful, please click ‘Like’, Retweet or post a comment.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *