Can we really watch 3D movies without having to wear 3D eyewear?

This may sound to good to be true but it is possible. Researchers in South Korea are currently experimenting on the use of polarized technology to develop glasses-free 3D cinemas for the near future.

The History Of 3D Glasses

3D eyewear was first seen in the late 1800's to the early 1900's. Known as "Anaglyph 3D" to view 3D images and film, special colour-coded glasses needed to be worn. Originally the colour of the lenses were red/green but it was later adjusted to red/cyan for better contrast and colour perception. These red/cyan glasses were worn to view comics and magazines in 3D. They were also worn in the theatres to watch the latest movies.

3D Glasses Today

The whole design of 3D glasses changed; the red/cyan lenses were swapped for black/grey polarized lenses which provided better contrast and image quality. The glasses were no longer made from card and instead, made from a durable plastic in fashionable styles e.g. Real-D 3D glasses were designed to look like the popular Ray-Ban Wayfarer. Designer brands such as Gucci, Polaroid, and Oakley have all designed their own versions of 3D glasses which can be worn in cinemas.

Glasses-free 3D Technology

In 2010, Toshiba launched the first prototype of 3D televisions without the need for 3D glasses. Despite the great attempt, glasses-free 3D televisions failed to pass the prototype stage of research and development. This was down to many factors including cost and feasibility.

However a recent discovery by South Korean researchers have found a way to produce glasses-free 3D screens in a cost-effective way.

A team of researchers at Seoul National University in South Korea have been experimenting with ways to use the polarized technology on a large scale. The researchers believe that the technique they've discovered may be the answer to our dream of experiencing 3D movies without glasses. If the experiments are successful, expect to see a glasses-free 3D cinema near you very soon!

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